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Dr. Janet Rossant is a Senior Scientist in the Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program at The Hospital for Sick Children and is a Professor in both the Department of Molecular Genetics and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Toronto. Her research interests center on understanding the genetic control of normal and abnormal development in the early mouse embryo using both cellular and genetic manipulation techniques. Her interests in the early embryo have led to the discovery of a novel placental stem cell type, the trophoblast stem cell. Rossant is also the Director of the newly formed Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

Featured Resource: STEMdiff™ Definitive Endoderm Kit: Defined Animal Component-Free Medium for the Differentiation of Human ES and iPS Cells to Definitive Endoderm

Resources and Links

Cancer Vaccine Eliminates Tumors in Mice– Injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Tiny Stomach Found in Lung Tumors– Findings demonstrate that elements of pathologic tumor plasticity mirror the normal developmental history of organs in that cancer cells acquire cell fates associated with developmentally related neighboring organs.

Is the Interstitium a New Organ?– A study confirms that the spaces between cells are fluid-filled, rather than tightly packed with connective tissue, but pathologists say the implications of the findings remain to be seen.

Brain Organoids and Blood Vessels– Unpredictable variations and deficiencies have hampered the usefulness of organoids in research, but new techniques for creating mini-brains may change that.

RPE Cell Transplantation to Treat Macular Degeneration – Scientists demonstrated the feasibility and safety of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) patch transplantation as a regenerative strategy for age-related macular degeneration.

Human Hippocampal Neurogenesis Persists throughout Aging – Researchers found that healthy older subjects without cognitive impairment, neuropsychiatric disease or treatment display preserved neurogenesis.

Photo Reference: Courtesy of Dr. Janet Rossant