Dr. David Hay is the Chair of Tissue Engineering at the University of Edinburgh, where his group is defining novel ways to produce liver tissue from PSCs. They use in vitro derived tissue to better model human liver physiology and to develop supportive cell based therapies for disease. Dr. Hay also founded Stimuliver, a company that is developing a disruptive liver implant to treat critically failing liver function in humans. He talks about hepatocyte differentiation, liver disease modeling, and automating the production of cell therapies.
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Dr. Agnete Kirkeby is an Associate Professor at the University of Copenhagen and a Group Leader at Lund University. The Kirkeby group studies the factors involved in human neural subtype specification in order to enable production of specific neurons for understanding and treating neurological diseases. They apply advanced human stem cells models to understand how hundreds of human neuronal subtypes are formed during embryo development. She talks about moving stem cell therapies for Parkinson’s disease from animal models to clinical trials, modeling neural tube development, and developing treatments for narcolepsy.
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Dr. Melissa Little is the President, Keith Alm is the CEO, and Dr. Amander Clark is the Vice President of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). They discuss what they’re looking forward to at the upcoming ISSCR 2022 meeting, and the future of the organization and the stem cell research community.
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Dr. Kelly McNagny is a Professor of Medical Genetics and Biomedical Engineering at the University of British Columbia. His research program is focused on hematopoietic stem cell biology, specifically in understanding the signaling networks that regulate stem cell differentiation and how these cells interact with their microenvironment. He talks about how hematopoietic stem cell differentiation is related to chronic inflammatory disorders, targeting glycosylation in solid tumors, and his international career path.
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Dr. Mingxia Gu is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Her lab’s goal is to develop novel therapies for the regeneration of the heart, lung, and vasculature in patients with congenital cardiac and pulmonary defects. She talks about developing lung organoids to study COVID-19, how multi-lineage organoids can mimic human tissues, and her lab’s motto to “move fast and break things.”
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