Dr. Prisca Liberali is Senior Group Leader at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research and an Assistant Professor at the University of Basel. Her research aims to understand the collective properties of organoid systems and their patterns, including how these systems allow systematic perturbation by established methods for modulating gene expression. She studies self-organization, symmetry breaking, intestinal organoid development, gastruloids, and mechanosensing mechanisms.
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Dr. Ophir Klein is the inaugural Executive Director of Cedars-Sinai Guerin Children’s and the David and Meredith Kaplan Distinguished Chair in Children’s Health. He discusses his work on intestinal epithelium regeneration, which he will present at the “Tissue Fibrosis and Repair: Mechanism, Human Disease, and Therapies” Keystone Symposium taking place from June 12-16th in Keystone, Colorado. He also talks about mechanisms of tooth development, analyzing three-dimensional facial images to diagnose genetic syndromes, and how parasitic infections affect the intestinal stem cell niche.
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Dr. Mingxia Gu is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Her lab’s goal is to develop novel therapies for the regeneration of the heart, lung, and vasculature in patients with congenital cardiac and pulmonary defects. She talks about developing lung organoids to study COVID-19, how multi-lineage organoids can mimic human tissues, and her lab’s motto to “move fast and break things.”
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In June 2021, we attended the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) virtual annual meeting, and recorded daily video episodes discussing highlights of the previous 24 hours. Here is the second of five special episodes from the meeting featuring Dr. Madeline Lancaster from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology, who was honored with the Dr. Susan Lim Award for Outstanding Young Investigator Lecture at the meeting.
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Dr. Jürgen Knoblich is Scientific Director of the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The Knoblich lab is known for the development of an organoid model of early brain development, and is currently using iPSCs and cerebral organoids to investigate inter-brain region interactions, neurodevelopmental disorders, and neuronal connections and functions.
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